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2023 Leaders in Graduate Education in International Affairs

Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies

Preparing Future Leaders with World-Class Education in Policy and Economics

 

Filipe Campante, Vice Dean for Faculty Affairs, School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University

The day US citizens voted in the midterm elections, Filipe Campante, vice dean for faculty affairs at Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), participated in a discussion on the aftermath of the Brazilian presidential election.

In his monthly column for Brazilian news outlet Nexo Jornal, Campante noted the role of “the big lie” in the campaigns of Brazil’s Jair Bolsonaro and former US President Donald Trump. Adopting Trump’s messaging about a rigged election, Bolsonaro launched Brazil on the same political trajectory as the US, Campante wrote.

“A certain sector of the US believes that election results are contestable, reflecting an authoritarian mindset and destabilizing governance in dangerous ways,” says Campante. “Using the template created by Trump and echoed by Bolsonaro, future politicians could run elections in ways that make it harder for the opposition to win.”

I tell students to think about where they want to be five to 10 years from now and then work backward. That way, you can break it down to what’s the best choice today to put you in the best place to choose again tomorrow, to try and achieve that goal. This is an important lesson that you learn in economics.Filipe Campante

An expert in political economy, development economics, and urban and regional issues, Campante teaches and researches the impact of economics on politics and governance. He also co-directs the DC Political Economy Center—a hub for DC-area political economists that fosters research, shares briefs on critical issues with policymakers, and sponsors an annual conference.

Students at SAIS benefit immensely from the teaching and mentoring of renowned faculty like Campante—becoming well-grounded in the interplay between policy and economics, in the global and comparative context, and equipped to adapt quickly to changes in their career journey.

In fall 2023, SAIS will welcome students to its new home at 555 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, DC, providing unprecedented opportunities for mentorship and interdisciplinary collaboration involving students, faculty, and policymakers.

“I tell students to think about where they want to be five to 10 years from now and then work backward,” says Campante. “That way, you can break it down to what’s the best choice today to put you in the best place to choose again tomorrow, to try and achieve that goal. This is an important lesson that you learn in economics.”


SAIS’s New Home Provides Unique Student Experiences and Learning Opportunities

In fall 2023, Johns Hopkins SAIS will welcome students to its new home at 555 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, DC. This state-of-the-art facility expands the school’s capacity for teaching excellence and evidence-based research toward addressing global challenges. The building is minutes from the US Capitol, the White House, and Union Station.
>>>Designed to foster community and collaboration, 555 Pennsylvania Avenue boasts 38 high-tech classrooms, a 375-seat theater and performing arts space, group and individual study spaces, lounges, and roof terraces with views of Pennsylvania Avenue and the Capitol. Student amenities include a library, coffee shop, restaurant, and fitness center. Event spaces will host prominent policymakers and global leaders. Other divisions of Johns Hopkins University will also have a presence in the building, providing unmatched opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration.

Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies
https://sais.jhu.edu
sais.dc.admissions@jhu.edu
202-663-5700